Sojourns

Reflections on a year in 365 photographs

Posts Tagged ‘tritone

Project 365:ONE-HUNDRED-EIGHTY-ONE

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Having a little self portrait fun tonight and playing around with the lighting…

A self portrait series.

Surprise!

A self portrait series.

Patience

A self portrait series.

Stumped

A self portrait series.

Angry Man

A self portrait series.

Boredom

A self portrait series.

Warning!

A self portrait series.

Huh?

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Written by Brian Fancher

June 30, 2010 at 7:56 pm

Project 365:ONE-HUNDRED-THIRTY-ONE

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Calhoun and King Streets at night in Charleston, SC

Flow

Considering the image:  Calhoun and King Street in downtown Charleston is one of the busiest intersections as well as a great place to grab a java and people watch.  The Francis Marion Hotel and the Starbucks coffee shop make a great backdrop for this long exposure of the street traffic.  They also meant there would surely be people in the image.  Without them, this would be a boring shot.  There might have been more foot traffic but I suppose most of the College of Charleston students are either studying for exams or done and gone for the summer.

Making the photograph:  For this photograph out came the trusty EF 24mm f/2.8 in order to capture most of the hotel facade.  I set the camera to aperture priority,  ISO to 100 and closed down the aperture to f/18 in order to get a 10 second exposure that would render the car lights as trails.  I had to keep the overall exposure down to -2EV to prevent blown highlights on the upper level of the hotel and inside the Starbucks.  Post processing was a black and white conversion using the green filter setting and adjusting slightly, high pass contrast layer, sharpening, cropping, and tri-toning.

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Written by Brian Fancher

May 11, 2010 at 10:04 pm

365:NINETY-ONE

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Last year's cattail stands strong against the onslaught of spring.

Resistance

We had taken a walk past this pond with last year’s cattails still standing earlier in the day and I got some decent shots with my cool new/old Canon  80-200mm f/2.8 L lens.  With that lens, the rows of cattails could be compressed into a decent frame.  But I just wasn’t satisfied that the photographs would be what I wanted to show for today.

So I awoke from a nap today with this image in my mind.  I quickly changed out lenses back to my little nifty-fifty 50mm f/1.8 and headed back down the road to the little pond.  I shot with the cattail directly backlit by the late-afternoon sun.  Still, I wasn’t satisfied that I had what I wanted to produce this image.  The cattail was totally dark silhouetted against the sky with no detail except in the wispy remnants.  So I grabbed the 580EX II flash, put it on the hotshoe, dialed up ETTL and high-speed sync so that I could keep the 1/8000 shutter speed, and fired away with about -2EV exposure compensation and +1EV flash compensation.  Perfect exposure for what had in mind.

In post processing, I used black and white (neutral density filter), curves, and brightness/contrast adjustment layers in Photoshop.  I used high-pass filter and unsharp mask sharpening on the master image before cropping to 8×10 format.  Once cropped I changed to grayscale 8-bit mode so that I could apply a tritone to the image.  The image I had in mind had blue and gold in the tritone so that is what you see here.  After toning I sized for the web and saved.

So here is my photograph of last year’s cattail standing tall against the onslaught of spring here in the lowcountry.

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Written by Brian Fancher

April 1, 2010 at 3:47 pm