Sojourns

Reflections on a year in 365 photographs

Posts Tagged ‘Canon

Project 365:TWO-HUNDRED-SIXTY-FIVE

with one comment

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country.

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country II

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country III

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country IV

Mt Pleasant Cross Country V

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country V

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country VI

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country VII

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country VIII

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country IX

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country

Mt. Pleasant Cross Country X

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Written by Brian Fancher

September 22, 2010 at 9:05 pm

Project 365:ONE-HUNDRED-FIFTY-ONE

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Memorial Day from my porch.

Sanctuary

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Written by Brian Fancher

May 31, 2010 at 6:03 pm

365:ONE-HUNDRED-THIRTEEN

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Our old friend, the moon.

An Old Friend

Shooting the moon is not as difficult as it might seem at first glance.  Simply put your camera in manual mode, select the sharpest aperture for your particular lens, and then dial up the shutter speed until you aren’t blowing it out completely.  If you let your camera decide all of the exposure information it will blow the moon out to pure white and start to expose the rest of the sky.  You have to dial back 4-5 stops from what your camera might guess is “proper” exposure for the information in the frame.  Go manual and check the histogram!

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Written by Brian Fancher

April 23, 2010 at 8:20 pm

365:EIGHTY-NINE

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Pine pollen gathers in a runoff pond near my house

Achoo!

Yes, it is Benadryl and Zyrtec season again!  The pine pollen is out in force this week, making it difficult to keep windows open or be outside.  For this photograph I used a polarizer on my 24 f/2.8 and stopped it about midway between where the reflections were strongest and where they disappeared altogether.  I wanted to have some reflection of the offending pine trees in the water behind the rocks where the pollen is collecting.

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Written by Brian Fancher

March 30, 2010 at 5:46 pm

365:FIFTY-NINE

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Folly Beach lighthouse from Folly Beach at low tide.

Beacon

Today turned into an adventure day for the family.  First up was frisbee and swinging at James Island County Park.  Next we explored the Angel Oak on John’s Island.  And last we took a walk on the end of Folly Beach where I spent some time photographing the lighthouse, which has been shored up and repaired to keep it standing.  Years ago you could walk to the lighthouse and even walk up inside.  That all changed with hurricanes like Hugo which forever changed the shoreline.  This area is still one of the most picturesque in all of the lowcountry.

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Written by Brian Fancher

February 28, 2010 at 8:22 pm

365:FIFTY-SIX

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An interesting old tree in Hampton Park, downtown Charleston near The Citadel

Gnarled

I saw this old tree in Hampton Park near The Citadel while on my usual Thursday tempo run.  I didn’t have much time after the run to come back and get a photo.  And this was the best that it could be isolated given the lenses available to me.  I used my trusty EF 24mm f2.8 and cropped as much out as I could in the viewfinder while leaving the tree top clear against the sky.  There is a trash can behind the trunk, so this was the only angle that could cut that out.  Not a bad composition given all the variables.

My post processing on subjects like this could use some work.   I wanted to bring out the detail in the trunk a little more, but the light was so bright that it was hard to contain the scene in the first place.  I had to be gentle with the adjustments or I started getting a lot of posterization.  I may come back to this image at some point and try a black and white process.

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Written by Brian Fancher

February 25, 2010 at 8:23 pm

365:FIFTY-FIVE

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An after-lunch walk by Colonial Lake in Charleston

The Walk

Today will be a two-for-one entry.  I couldn’t decide which photo I preferred for my daily photo entry.  I suppose if I’d been about two feet taller taking the woman’s photograph walking by Colonial Lake in Downtown Charleston, my choice would have been easy.  While I liked the photograph since it captured her introspective walk, the bright line of the wave line in the water bisects her head to a distracting degree.  The white industrial trucks of a cinema production company ringed the lake as well, preventing a more serene composition.  I converted to black and white and then applied a tritone to the final image before saving for the web.

An abandoned industrial building on the old Naval Base in Charleston

Silenced

I knew that I had “iffy” compositions and/or subjects for my Colonial Lake street photos, so I went back to an area I’m pulling a lot of subjects from on the old Naval Base in Charleston.  This is an abandoned industrial building near the piers and the waterfront park.  I was drawn to the vertical composition of the stacks against what I knew would be an empty sky.  I also knew it would work well in black and white, as you see here.  This image has a simple black and brown duotone applied before saving for the web.  I think this composition has more unity and harmony than the street scene.  But I’m less enamored of the subject itself.  Although I’ve done a lot of landscape so far, I prefer the human element.

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Written by Brian Fancher

February 24, 2010 at 7:19 pm